Project Gallery

Director

Matt Silva
(314) 362-8585
silvam@wustl.edu

Associate Directors

Simon Tang
(314) 286-2664
simon.tang@wustl.edu

Gretchen Meyer
(314) 286-1425
meyerg@wustl.edu

Research Administator

Tonia Thompson
(314) 747-2532
thompsont@wustl.edu

Administrative Coordinator

Orthopaedic Surgery
Kamilla McGhee
P. (314) 747-5993
F. (314) 454-5900
kjm@wustl.edu


Image 1: A 3D image of the majority of a mouse hind limb showing the tibia and femur and knee joint. Many researchers who use the resources of Core B are interested in morphological and densitometric outcomes in these bones.


Image 2: A CT scan of a mouse tibia/fibula with a strain gauge attached. With the many resources available in Core B researchers are able to validate that they are measuring bone adaptation outcomes to loading stimuli appropriately and consistently. (From: Patel TK et al, Experimental and finite element analysis of strains induced by axial tibial compression in young-adult and old female C57Bl/6 mice. J Biomech. (Accepted Nov. 2013))


Image 3: Overlayed CT scans of a normal and clubfoot mouse with images registered about the tibia. Advanced image analysis techniques are available to users of Core B to attempt to quantify structural differences between animal genetic lines or treatment groups. (From: Alvarado DM et al, Hum Mol Genet. 2011 October 15; 20(20): 3943–3952. Published online 2011 July 20. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddr313)


Image 4: Results from a finite element analysis of a mouse tibia/fibula complex. Advanced modeling techniques are available to users of Core B should their research questions call for such analysis. (From: Patel TK et al, Experimental and finite element analysis of strains induced by axial tibial compression in young-adult and old female C57Bl/6 mice. J Biomech. (Accepted Nov. 2013))


Image 5: Comparison of proximal tibial cancellous bone between control and diabetic rats. The CT facilities available in Core B facilitate quick and accurate analysis of cancellous and cortical bone parameters. (From: Silva MJ et al., J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Sep;24(9):1618-27. doi: 10.1359/jbmr.090316.Type 1 diabetes in young rats leads to progressive trabecular bone loss, cessation of cortical bone growth, and diminished whole bone strength and fatigue life.)


Image 6: A 3D image generated from a CT scan of a mouse ulna in a stress fracture healing study. CT scanning performed in such models allows for detailed and accurate characterization of how animals heal in such challenge models.


Image 7: A radiographic scan of mouse femur callous formation in a fracture model. Simple planar radiography is available to Core B users in addition to CT scanning to provide a complete picture of bone structure and strength.


Image 8: A 3D picture generated from a CT scan of a mouse femur in a complete fracture model; the callous is pictured in purple and bone in gray. Values derived from CT scanning can provide important information in the ability of an animal to respond to severe challenges, such as callous volume and mineralization.


Image 9: A CT scan taken with contrast agent demonstrating differences in vascularization during fracture healing.


Image10: A heat map visualization of the thickness of blood vessels in a rat placenta. Scanning blood vessels with a contrast agent can provide important information on the structure and organization of vasculature.


Image 11: A 3D reconstruction of a human tooth derived from a CT scan. In this image the root structure is highlighted for visualization of its quality and organization.


Image 12: Side by side comparison of a normal and scoliotic zebrafish. Facilities available in Core B allow for analysis of traditional murine animal models as well as emerging models such as zebrafish.


Image 13: An MRI scan demonstrating mouse knee edema. In addition to classic radiography and CT, users of Core B also have access to powerful research grade MRI facilities to fully understand their animal models.